Friday, August 10, 2012

Import log bea balm


Blog EntryOct 23, '07 1:55 PM
for everyone
Entry for August 03, 2007-study on Bee Balm
magnify
Kinda pooped today after working with the moving all week, so not really getting any wheres today. Also so extremely hot and humid still, it makes ya tired.
So after enjoying all the food friday blogs today, I thought I would check out bee balm.
Researching the net for bee balm:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bee_balm
http://altnature.com/gallery/beebalm.htm
http://herbalmusings.com/Monarda%20Bergamot%20Bee%20Balm.htm this site has a couple recipes, and history of bee balm
some recipes with bee balm:


Recipes:
Monarda Sandwich Spread

Try this on bagels or cinnamon raisin bread, or use on tea sandwiches and garnish with fresh bee balm flowers for a bright look.
2 8 oz packages cream cheese
1/3 cup canned pineapple chunks, minced
2 tbsp monarda leaves, chopped
1 tbsp spearmint leaves, chopped
Allow the cream cheese to soften to room temperature. Put in processor or blender and pulse on and off until mixture is smooth. All pineapple and pulse until well mixed. Put mixture in bowl and stir in monarda and spearmint leaves. Refrigerate until cheese has hardened slightly before using.
Bee Balm and Raspberry Summer Punch

A beautiful looking drink. Garnish with fresh monarda and borage flowers. Add 2 cups of white wine or 1 cup vodka for an alcoholic punch.
1 cup sugar 1 cup lemon juice
1 cup Bee balm leaves 1/2 cup raspberries
1 pint cranberries 1/2 cup spearmint leaves
1 47 oz can chilled pineapple juice
3 liters ginger ale
Dissolve sugar in the lemon juice, over low heat. Add bee balm and raspberries. Bring to a simmer, stirring to break up the raspberries. When the sugar is dissolved, strain leaves and berries out of the liquid. Add cranberry juice and mint, stirring well. Store for 24 hrs in a qt bottle in the refrigerator. When ready to serve, pour the base into a punch bowl and add pineapple juice and ice, then add ginger ale right before serving and garnish.
http://www.morningsunherbfarm.com/mint1_3.html this site also had other good info.
Bee Balm (Monarda didyma or M. fistulosa). Also called “wild bergamot” or “sweet leaf,” bee balm is one of the best plants to poultice on burns of any kind.
above statement from here- http://crabappleherbs.com/blog/category/herbs/bee-balm/


Bee Balm
A Beautiful and Useful Plant for your Garden

By Monica Resinger

Description and Growing Information
Bee Balm is a very pretty herb with a wonderful fruity, minty aroma. The gorgeous tubular flowers, held like a crown at the top of the 3-4 foot stems in mid and late summer come in a lot of colors including red, pink and purple.

On top of all these qualities, it is a hardy perennial herb that will grow in all zones. Bee Balm requires full sun or light shade and fertile, light and moist soil. It is best propagated by division or cuttings rather than seed because the seed isn't always true to the parent plant.
In the Garden

Bee Balm is so pretty it should be included in your flower beds. It will attract bees, butterflies and hummingbirds to your garden. I know it's hard to welcome bees into the garden, but remember that we need them to pollinate our plants. Good partners for Bee Balm are Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea), Black Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia), and Lavender (Lavandula). .

Uses

Tea. This is a wonderful tea herb. To make a cup of tea, simply place tablespoon of fresh or one teaspoon of dried Bee Balm leaves and/or flowers in a tea strainer or tea spoon and pour one cup of boiling water over it. Allow it to steep for ten minutes and bring the tea out. Sweeten if you wish and enjoy.

Cut Flowers. The flowers make excellent cut flowers. Be sure to cut the stems at an angle so they can take up water.

Culinary. Chop the leaves and flowers and add to fruit salads for extra flavor. Garnish any type of salad with the leaves and flowers.
Preserving

The leaves and flowers of Bee Balm can be dried and used for potpourri or tea. To dry, bundle 8-10 stems with a rubber band at the cut end and hang upside down until crisp to the touch. Crush and store in airtight containers out of direct sunlight.
Bee Balm can be added to fruit salads, pork recipes, punches and other beverage recipes plus it can be substituted for mint.
Summer Punch
Ingredients:
1 cup granulated sugar
1 cup fresh lemon juice
1 cup Bee balm leaves
1/2 cup raspberries
2 cups cranberry juice
1/2 cup mint leaves (any variety)
1 47 ounce can chilled pineapple juice
3 liters of ginger ale
In a sauce pan dissolve the sugar in the lemon juice, over low heat. Add the bee balm and raspberries. Bring to a simmer, stir to break up the raspberries. When the sugar is dissolved, strain leaves and berries out of the liquid. Add cranberry juice and mint, stirring well. Chill up to 24 hours. When ready to serve, pour into a punch bowl and add pineapple juice, ice and ginger ale.
Bee Balm Iced Tea
Ingredients:
1/2 cup Bee Balm flowers and leaves
8 cups boiling water
Pour the boiling water over the Bee Balm. Cover and steep until cool, about an hour. Strain and discard flowers. You can sweeten with sugar if desired. Chill until ready to use and serve over ice.
Bee Balm Tea: Pour one cup of boiling water over 1/4 cup fresh leaves and allow to brew for 5 minutes. Strain and sweeten if you wish before serving. To use dried bee balm pour one cup of boiling water over two teaspoons of the dried leaves. Brew the same and strain.
Summer Tea Blend
Ingredients:
3 tbsp. dried chamomile flowers
1 tbsp. dried bee balm leaves
2 tsp. dried rosemary
1 tbsp. apple or pineapple mint leaves
Mix all the dried herbs together in a jar. Use 2 tsp. of the mix per cup of tea. Steep for 5 minutes and strain. Sweeten with honey or sugar if you wish.
About the author:Brenda Hyde is an avid herb gardener, wife and mom to three living in the midwest United States. She's also editor and owner of Old Fashioned Living.
You can buy bulk dried Bee Balm at Glenbrook Farm
from: http://www.seedsofknowledge.com/beebalm2.html

The flavor of Earl Gray tea is often attributed to Monarda, yet, the taste actually originates from the oil of Citrus aurantium bergamia. The plants are unrelated but have similar flavors. To create a mock-Earl Gray tea, steep 2 tablespoons of dried Monarda flowers with a good black tea for 5-7 minutes. A single cup can be made by pouring one cup of boiling water over 2 teaspoons of dried flowers in a tea infuser or strainer. DO NOT BOIL THE FLOWERS. Boiling can evaporate the oils which produce the flavor. It is best to use the flowers for tea, the leaves have a hotter, oregano-like flavor.
The flavor of Monarda combines well with tropical fruits like pineapple, mango and orange. Use flowers and leaves in recipes for chicken, turkey, and pork dishes. Monarda fruit punch is delicious, and the flowers a colourful addition to salads.


National Herb Week Punch

  • 1 gallon cranberry-raspberry juice with ½ gallon set aside
  • 1 quart can apricot nectar
  • 2 quarts Bee Balm tea, with one quart set aside (see below)
  • 1 orange, sliced
  • 1 lemon, sliced
  • 2 quarts club soda
    Prepare the day ahead by putting all ingredients in the refrigerator to chill. Combine the half gallon of cranberry-raspberry juice and 1 quart of the Bee Balm tea and freeze that amount in ice cube trays or quart freezer container. Freeze for 24 hours before serving time. To serve: Put frozen juice in punch bowl and pour remaining liquid over, adding orange and lemon slices. Add 2 quarts of chilled club soda and float Bee Balm flowers if desired.


    Bee Balm Tea

  • ½ cup Bee Balm flowers or flowers and leaves
  • 2 quarts (8 cups) boiling water
    Pour rapidly boiling water over Bee Balm flowers. Cover and steep until cool, about an hour. Strain and discard flowers. Chill until ready to use.


    Comments regarding the above article can be addressed to:
    Marilyn Edmison-Driedger
    E-mail The Herbal Touch

    from: http://www.theherbaltouch.com/iha/monarda.html

    this is a site I found that sells their own homemade soap with bee balm and oatmeal, describes how they do it
    http://www.localharvest.org/store/item.jsp?id=615


    These spicy flowers are large and colorful. The red varieties like Cambridge Scarlet Bee Balm tend to be a bit hotter than their purple counterparts. But, the purple flowered varieties produce more flowers for a longer period of time. Often called Bergamot because of its citrusy flavor similar to the Bergamot Orange Tree, a tablespoon of Bee Balm flowers makes a great addition to the oil when frying white fish or scallops. Their strong flavor also goes well with meat and pork dishes. Whole flowers make attractive floaters in punch bowls of Sangria. Whole flowers also make good plate rings; surround the outside of your entrée platter with Bee Balm flowers to create a more visually appealing dish. Bee Balm flowers can be fresh frozen and will keep for two months or more.
    Bee Balm is a herbaceous plant, which means it dies back to the ground in the winter. Each year the base of the plant will spread as its stems spread just under the surface of the soil and set down roots. Mulching encourages this by giving the rhizomes soft dirt to stretch out in.
    Bee Balm leaves are very strongly flavored and should be dried before use. Add the dried leaves to black tea and make your own Earl Grey.
    from here- http://www.mountainvalleygrowers.com/edibleflowerherbgarden.htm
    BEE BALM
    Used for bee Stings. Bee Balm is a member of the mint family. It is native to North America but colonists soon sent seeds to Europe for their friends to plant and enjoy. Tea brewed from its leaves was called Oswego tea and was used as a substitute for china tea after the 1773 Boston Tea Party.
    from here-interesting site about the history of herbs- http://www.chaddsfordhistory.org/history/herbs4.htm
    For the Cook Who Likes to Garden, and the Gardener Who Likes to Cook:
    Bee Balm and Peaches

    by R. Ohlgren-Evans, from the August 1998 newsletter Bee Balm (Monarda didyma), also known as Bergamot, may owe its name to the resemblance of its fragrance to that of the bergamot orange. However, it is the orange, not the herb, whose oil flavors Earl Grey tea and some perfumes. Bee balm is often found in gardens on the Palouse, probably because of its reputation as a great lure to bees and hummingbirds. Scarlet is the most common and best-known color of this species, but cultivars range from white to pink and lavender. To use them in the kitchen, rinse the flower heads gently and pat dry. Pull the individual florets from the blossom head. Bergamot flowers are especially good with summer fruits and are used in jams, jellies, and desserts, and also make a colorful garnish for salads and drinks. Peach Shortcakes with Bergamot Flowers
    6 to 8 very ripe peaches, peeled and sliced
    1 Tbs. lemon juice
    1 to 2 Tbs. Bergamot florets
    2 cups flour
    1 Tbs. baking powder
    Scant ½ tsp. salt
    3 Tbs. sugar
    6 Tbs. butter
    1 cup half-and-half with 1 Tbs. Bergamot florets
    1 Tbs. butter, melted
    Whipping cream or vanilla ice cream or yogurt
    Preheat oven to 425 degrees F, and lightly grease a baking sheet. Toss the peaches in a bowl with the lemon juice, sugar and half of the Bergamot flowers. If the fruit is tart, use the larger amount of sugar; if it is sweet, use less. Reserve the remaining flowers for garnishing the dessert.
    Combine the flour, baking powder, salt, and 2 Tbs. of the sugar in a bowl or food processor. Cut the butter into the mixture until it is a coarse meal. Add the half-and-half with the Bergamot flowers to the
    dry ingredients and mix until just blended; do not overmix. Turn the dough onto a floured surface and knead 8 or 10 times. Roll or pat the dough to about 3/4 inches thick. Using a 3-inch cutter, cut out rounds using all of the dough. Place the rounds of dough on the baking sheet, brush the tops with the melted butter, and sprinkle them with the reserved tablespoon of sugar. Bake the cakes in the center of the oven for 12 to 14 minutes, or until golden brown. Cool the shortcakes for at least 5 minutes before splitting them open; they are best served warm, but are still good at room temperature. To assemble the shortcakes, split them in half. Place a spoonful of fruit on the bottom half with a bit of the juice. Add a dollop of whipped cream (or substitute) and cover with the top half of the shortcake. Repeat layers of fruit and cream and garnish the top with a few peach slices. Scatter the reserved Bergamot blossoms over the desserts and serve immediately.


    from- http://www.moscowfood.coop/archive/9808recipies.html

    I will end with this article from: http://www.emedicinal.com/herbs/americanbeebalm.php

    Legends, Myths and Stories

    This plant is entirely different and hardier than Melissa. It is a beautiful scarlet flowering native American mint. The foliage has a perfume fragrance. The flowers are so popular with bees that the plant deserves the name American bee balm. Bergamot or bee balm is a part of American history; it is a source of tea which was a popular substitute for the imported variety amongst the mid-Atlantic patriots in the wake of the Boston Tea Party. That period was probably the best in bergamot's history, though it retains its mystique, thanks to a striking appearance and the richly American nick-name, Oswego tea. The name Oswego tea came from the town, Oswego, New York? More likely both the town and the tea acquired the name Oswego from the Native Americans inhabiting the area, who had it first. The Native Americans passed their knowledge of the plant to the colonists, and one, a John Bartram of Philadelphia, reportedly sent seeds to England in the mid-1700s. From England, bergamot traveled to the Continent, where it is still cultivated, generally under the names gold melissa and Indian nettle. Among the foremost growers of this herb in the United States were the Shakers, who had a settlement near Oswego, New York. The Shakers were among America's great herbalists; they valued bergamot not only for tea and culinary uses, but for its medicinal virtues. The leaves can be used to flavor apple jelly, fruit cups, and salads. The entire plant emits a strong fragrance similar to citrus, but most like that of the tropical tree, orange bergamot, hence the nickname bergamot. The scent is suitable for use in potpourris and other scented mixtures. The bright red flowers attract bees, hummingbirds, and butterflies and make striking, long-lasting cut blooms. The blossoms provide the flavoring for the famous Earl Grey tea. The flowers are also edible. The hills around Pittsfield, Massachusetts are rife with this plant, wild and domestic.


    Uses

    An infusion is good for colds, coughs, nausea, and sore throats. Native Americans used leaf tea for colic, gas, colds, fever, stomachaches, nosebleeds, insomnia, heart trouble, measles, and to induce sweating. Poultice used for headaches. Historically, physicians used leaf tea to expel worms and gas.


    Formulas or Dosages

    The best quality tea material is achieved if the leaves are stripped off the square, hollow stems and dried in warm shade within 2-3 days. A longer drying period might discolor the leaves, producing an inferior type product. Finish drying with artificial heat when necessary.

  • Blog EntryOct 23, '07 1:55 PM
    for everyone
    Entry for August 03, 2007-study on Bee Balm
    magnify
    Kinda pooped today after working with the moving all week, so not really getting any wheres today. Also so extremely hot and humid still, it makes ya tired.
    So after enjoying all the food friday blogs today, I thought I would check out bee balm.
    Researching the net for bee balm:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bee_balm
    http://altnature.com/gallery/beebalm.htm
    http://herbalmusings.com/Monarda%20Bergamot%20Bee%20Balm.htm this site has a couple recipes, and history of bee balm
    some recipes with bee balm:


    Recipes:
    Monarda Sandwich Spread
    Try this on bagels or cinnamon raisin bread, or use on tea sandwiches and garnish with fresh bee balm flowers for a bright look.
    2 8 oz packages cream cheese
    1/3 cup canned pineapple chunks, minced
    2 tbsp monarda leaves, chopped
    1 tbsp spearmint leaves, chopped
    Allow the cream cheese to soften to room temperature. Put in processor or blender and pulse on and off until mixture is smooth. All pineapple and pulse until well mixed. Put mixture in bowl and stir in monarda and spearmint leaves. Refrigerate until cheese has hardened slightly before using.
    Bee Balm and Raspberry Summer Punch

    A beautiful looking drink. Garnish with fresh monarda and borage flowers. Add 2 cups of white wine or 1 cup vodka for an alcoholic punch.
    1 cup sugar 1 cup lemon juice
    1 cup Bee balm leaves 1/2 cup raspberries
    1 pint cranberries 1/2 cup spearmint leaves
    1 47 oz can chilled pineapple juice
    3 liters ginger ale
    Dissolve sugar in the lemon juice, over low heat. Add bee balm and raspberries. Bring to a simmer, stirring to break up the raspberries. When the sugar is dissolved, strain leaves and berries out of the liquid. Add cranberry juice and mint, stirring well. Store for 24 hrs in a qt bottle in the refrigerator. When ready to serve, pour the base into a punch bowl and add pineapple juice and ice, then add ginger ale right before serving and garnish.
    http://www.morningsunherbfarm.com/mint1_3.html this site also had other good info.
    Bee Balm (Monarda didyma or M. fistulosa). Also called “wild bergamot” or “sweet leaf,” bee balm is one of the best plants to poultice on burns of any kind.
    above statement from here- http://crabappleherbs.com/blog/category/herbs/bee-balm/


    Bee Balm
    A Beautiful and Useful Plant for your Garden

    By Monica Resinger

    Description and Growing Information
    Bee Balm is a very pretty herb with a wonderful fruity, minty aroma. The gorgeous tubular flowers, held like a crown at the top of the 3-4 foot stems in mid and late summer come in a lot of colors including red, pink and purple.

    On top of all these qualities, it is a hardy perennial herb that will grow in all zones. Bee Balm requires full sun or light shade and fertile, light and moist soil. It is best propagated by division or cuttings rather than seed because the seed isn't always true to the parent plant.
    In the Garden

    Bee Balm is so pretty it should be included in your flower beds. It will attract bees, butterflies and hummingbirds to your garden. I know it's hard to welcome bees into the garden, but remember that we need them to pollinate our plants. Good partners for Bee Balm are Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea), Black Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia), and Lavender (Lavandula). .

    Uses

    Tea. This is a wonderful tea herb. To make a cup of tea, simply place tablespoon of fresh or one teaspoon of dried Bee Balm leaves and/or flowers in a tea strainer or tea spoon and pour one cup of boiling water over it. Allow it to steep for ten minutes and bring the tea out. Sweeten if you wish and enjoy.

    Cut Flowers. The flowers make excellent cut flowers. Be sure to cut the stems at an angle so they can take up water.

    Culinary. Chop the leaves and flowers and add to fruit salads for extra flavor. Garnish any type of salad with the leaves and flowers.
    Preserving

    The leaves and flowers of Bee Balm can be dried and used for potpourri or tea. To dry, bundle 8-10 stems with a rubber band at the cut end and hang upside down until crisp to the touch. Crush and store in airtight containers out of direct sunlight.
    Bee Balm can be added to fruit salads, pork recipes, punches and other beverage recipes plus it can be substituted for mint.
    Summer Punch
    Ingredients:
    1 cup granulated sugar
    1 cup fresh lemon juice
    1 cup Bee balm leaves
    1/2 cup raspberries
    2 cups cranberry juice
    1/2 cup mint leaves (any variety)
    1 47 ounce can chilled pineapple juice
    3 liters of ginger ale
    In a sauce pan dissolve the sugar in the lemon juice, over low heat. Add the bee balm and raspberries. Bring to a simmer, stir to break up the raspberries. When the sugar is dissolved, strain leaves and berries out of the liquid. Add cranberry juice and mint, stirring well. Chill up to 24 hours. When ready to serve, pour into a punch bowl and add pineapple juice, ice and ginger ale.
    Bee Balm Iced Tea
    Ingredients:
    1/2 cup Bee Balm flowers and leaves
    8 cups boiling water
    Pour the boiling water over the Bee Balm. Cover and steep until cool, about an hour. Strain and discard flowers. You can sweeten with sugar if desired. Chill until ready to use and serve over ice.
    Bee Balm Tea: Pour one cup of boiling water over 1/4 cup fresh leaves and allow to brew for 5 minutes. Strain and sweeten if you wish before serving. To use dried bee balm pour one cup of boiling water over two teaspoons of the dried leaves. Brew the same and strain.
    Summer Tea Blend
    Ingredients:
    3 tbsp. dried chamomile flowers
    1 tbsp. dried bee balm leaves
    2 tsp. dried rosemary
    1 tbsp. apple or pineapple mint leaves
    Mix all the dried herbs together in a jar. Use 2 tsp. of the mix per cup of tea. Steep for 5 minutes and strain. Sweeten with honey or sugar if you wish.
    About the author:Brenda Hyde is an avid herb gardener, wife and mom to three living in the midwest United States. She's also editor and owner of Old Fashioned Living.
    You can buy bulk dried Bee Balm at Glenbrook Farm
    from: http://www.seedsofknowledge.com/beebalm2.html

    The flavor of Earl Gray tea is often attributed to Monarda, yet, the taste actually originates from the oil of Citrus aurantium bergamia. The plants are unrelated but have similar flavors. To create a mock-Earl Gray tea, steep 2 tablespoons of dried Monarda flowers with a good black tea for 5-7 minutes. A single cup can be made by pouring one cup of boiling water over 2 teaspoons of dried flowers in a tea infuser or strainer. DO NOT BOIL THE FLOWERS. Boiling can evaporate the oils which produce the flavor. It is best to use the flowers for tea, the leaves have a hotter, oregano-like flavor.
    The flavor of Monarda combines well with tropical fruits like pineapple, mango and orange. Use flowers and leaves in recipes for chicken, turkey, and pork dishes. Monarda fruit punch is delicious, and the flowers a colourful addition to salads.


    National Herb Week Punch

  • 1 gallon cranberry-raspberry juice with ½ gallon set aside
  • 1 quart can apricot nectar
  • 2 quarts Bee Balm tea, with one quart set aside (see below)
  • 1 orange, sliced
  • 1 lemon, sliced
  • 2 quarts club soda
    Prepare the day ahead by putting all ingredients in the refrigerator to chill. Combine the half gallon of cranberry-raspberry juice and 1 quart of the Bee Balm tea and freeze that amount in ice cube trays or quart freezer container. Freeze for 24 hours before serving time. To serve: Put frozen juice in punch bowl and pour remaining liquid over, adding orange and lemon slices. Add 2 quarts of chilled club soda and float Bee Balm flowers if desired.


    Bee Balm Tea

  • ½ cup Bee Balm flowers or flowers and leaves
  • 2 quarts (8 cups) boiling water
    Pour rapidly boiling water over Bee Balm flowers. Cover and steep until cool, about an hour. Strain and discard flowers. Chill until ready to use.


    Comments regarding the above article can be addressed to:
    Marilyn Edmison-Driedger
    E-mail The Herbal Touch

    from: http://www.theherbaltouch.com/iha/monarda.html

    this is a site I found that sells their own homemade soap with bee balm and oatmeal, describes how they do it
    http://www.localharvest.org/store/item.jsp?id=615


    These spicy flowers are large and colorful. The red varieties like Cambridge Scarlet Bee Balm tend to be a bit hotter than their purple counterparts. But, the purple flowered varieties produce more flowers for a longer period of time. Often called Bergamot because of its citrusy flavor similar to the Bergamot Orange Tree, a tablespoon of Bee Balm flowers makes a great addition to the oil when frying white fish or scallops. Their strong flavor also goes well with meat and pork dishes. Whole flowers make attractive floaters in punch bowls of Sangria. Whole flowers also make good plate rings; surround the outside of your entrée platter with Bee Balm flowers to create a more visually appealing dish. Bee Balm flowers can be fresh frozen and will keep for two months or more.
    Bee Balm is a herbaceous plant, which means it dies back to the ground in the winter. Each year the base of the plant will spread as its stems spread just under the surface of the soil and set down roots. Mulching encourages this by giving the rhizomes soft dirt to stretch out in.
    Bee Balm leaves are very strongly flavored and should be dried before use. Add the dried leaves to black tea and make your own Earl Grey.
    from here- http://www.mountainvalleygrowers.com/edibleflowerherbgarden.htm
    BEE BALM
    Used for bee Stings. Bee Balm is a member of the mint family. It is native to North America but colonists soon sent seeds to Europe for their friends to plant and enjoy. Tea brewed from its leaves was called Oswego tea and was used as a substitute for china tea after the 1773 Boston Tea Party.
    from here-interesting site about the history of herbs- http://www.chaddsfordhistory.org/history/herbs4.htm
    For the Cook Who Likes to Garden, and the Gardener Who Likes to Cook:
    Bee Balm and Peaches

    by R. Ohlgren-Evans, from the August 1998 newsletter Bee Balm (Monarda didyma), also known as Bergamot, may owe its name to the resemblance of its fragrance to that of the bergamot orange. However, it is the orange, not the herb, whose oil flavors Earl Grey tea and some perfumes. Bee balm is often found in gardens on the Palouse, probably because of its reputation as a great lure to bees and hummingbirds. Scarlet is the most common and best-known color of this species, but cultivars range from white to pink and lavender. To use them in the kitchen, rinse the flower heads gently and pat dry. Pull the individual florets from the blossom head. Bergamot flowers are especially good with summer fruits and are used in jams, jellies, and desserts, and also make a colorful garnish for salads and drinks. Peach Shortcakes with Bergamot Flowers
    6 to 8 very ripe peaches, peeled and sliced
    1 Tbs. lemon juice
    1 to 2 Tbs. Bergamot florets
    2 cups flour
    1 Tbs. baking powder
    Scant ½ tsp. salt
    3 Tbs. sugar
    6 Tbs. butter
    1 cup half-and-half with 1 Tbs. Bergamot florets
    1 Tbs. butter, melted
    Whipping cream or vanilla ice cream or yogurt
    Preheat oven to 425 degrees F, and lightly grease a baking sheet. Toss the peaches in a bowl with the lemon juice, sugar and half of the Bergamot flowers. If the fruit is tart, use the larger amount of sugar; if it is sweet, use less. Reserve the remaining flowers for garnishing the dessert.
    Combine the flour, baking powder, salt, and 2 Tbs. of the sugar in a bowl or food processor. Cut the butter into the mixture until it is a coarse meal. Add the half-and-half with the Bergamot flowers to the
    dry ingredients and mix until just blended; do not overmix. Turn the dough onto a floured surface and knead 8 or 10 times. Roll or pat the dough to about 3/4 inches thick. Using a 3-inch cutter, cut out rounds using all of the dough. Place the rounds of dough on the baking sheet, brush the tops with the melted butter, and sprinkle them with the reserved tablespoon of sugar. Bake the cakes in the center of the oven for 12 to 14 minutes, or until golden brown. Cool the shortcakes for at least 5 minutes before splitting them open; they are best served warm, but are still good at room temperature. To assemble the shortcakes, split them in half. Place a spoonful of fruit on the bottom half with a bit of the juice. Add a dollop of whipped cream (or substitute) and cover with the top half of the shortcake. Repeat layers of fruit and cream and garnish the top with a few peach slices. Scatter the reserved Bergamot blossoms over the desserts and serve immediately.


    from- http://www.moscowfood.coop/archive/9808recipies.html

    I will end with this article from: http://www.emedicinal.com/herbs/americanbeebalm.php

    Legends, Myths and Stories

    This plant is entirely different and hardier than Melissa. It is a beautiful scarlet flowering native American mint. The foliage has a perfume fragrance. The flowers are so popular with bees that the plant deserves the name American bee balm. Bergamot or bee balm is a part of American history; it is a source of tea which was a popular substitute for the imported variety amongst the mid-Atlantic patriots in the wake of the Boston Tea Party. That period was probably the best in bergamot's history, though it retains its mystique, thanks to a striking appearance and the richly American nick-name, Oswego tea. The name Oswego tea came from the town, Oswego, New York? More likely both the town and the tea acquired the name Oswego from the Native Americans inhabiting the area, who had it first. The Native Americans passed their knowledge of the plant to the colonists, and one, a John Bartram of Philadelphia, reportedly sent seeds to England in the mid-1700s. From England, bergamot traveled to the Continent, where it is still cultivated, generally under the names gold melissa and Indian nettle. Among the foremost growers of this herb in the United States were the Shakers, who had a settlement near Oswego, New York. The Shakers were among America's great herbalists; they valued bergamot not only for tea and culinary uses, but for its medicinal virtues. The leaves can be used to flavor apple jelly, fruit cups, and salads. The entire plant emits a strong fragrance similar to citrus, but most like that of the tropical tree, orange bergamot, hence the nickname bergamot. The scent is suitable for use in potpourris and other scented mixtures. The bright red flowers attract bees, hummingbirds, and butterflies and make striking, long-lasting cut blooms. The blossoms provide the flavoring for the famous Earl Grey tea. The flowers are also edible. The hills around Pittsfield, Massachusetts are rife with this plant, wild and domestic.


    Uses

    An infusion is good for colds, coughs, nausea, and sore throats. Native Americans used leaf tea for colic, gas, colds, fever, stomachaches, nosebleeds, insomnia, heart trouble, measles, and to induce sweating. Poultice used for headaches. Historically, physicians used leaf tea to expel worms and gas.


    Formulas or Dosages

    The best quality tea material is achieved if the leaves are stripped off the square, hollow stems and dried in warm shade within 2-3 days. A longer drying period might discolor the leaves, producing an inferior type product. Finish drying with artificial heat when necessary.

  • Blog EntryOct 23, '07 1:55 PM
    for everyone
    Entry for August 03, 2007-study on Bee Balm
    magnify
    Kinda pooped today after working with the moving all week, so not really getting any wheres today. Also so extremely hot and humid still, it makes ya tired.
    So after enjoying all the food friday blogs today, I thought I would check out bee balm.
    Researching the net for bee balm:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bee_balm
    http://altnature.com/gallery/beebalm.htm
    http://herbalmusings.com/Monarda%20Bergamot%20Bee%20Balm.htm this site has a couple recipes, and history of bee balm
    some recipes with bee balm:


    Recipes:
    Monarda Sandwich Spread
    Try this on bagels or cinnamon raisin bread, or use on tea sandwiches and garnish with fresh bee balm flowers for a bright look.
    2 8 oz packages cream cheese
    1/3 cup canned pineapple chunks, minced
    2 tbsp monarda leaves, chopped
    1 tbsp spearmint leaves, chopped
    Allow the cream cheese to soften to room temperature. Put in processor or blender and pulse on and off until mixture is smooth. All pineapple and pulse until well mixed. Put mixture in bowl and stir in monarda and spearmint leaves. Refrigerate until cheese has hardened slightly before using.
    Bee Balm and Raspberry Summer Punch

    A beautiful looking drink. Garnish with fresh monarda and borage flowers. Add 2 cups of white wine or 1 cup vodka for an alcoholic punch.
    1 cup sugar 1 cup lemon juice
    1 cup Bee balm leaves 1/2 cup raspberries
    1 pint cranberries 1/2 cup spearmint leaves
    1 47 oz can chilled pineapple juice
    3 liters ginger ale
    Dissolve sugar in the lemon juice, over low heat. Add bee balm and raspberries. Bring to a simmer, stirring to break up the raspberries. When the sugar is dissolved, strain leaves and berries out of the liquid. Add cranberry juice and mint, stirring well. Store for 24 hrs in a qt bottle in the refrigerator. When ready to serve, pour the base into a punch bowl and add pineapple juice and ice, then add ginger ale right before serving and garnish.
    http://www.morningsunherbfarm.com/mint1_3.html this site also had other good info.
    Bee Balm (Monarda didyma or M. fistulosa). Also called “wild bergamot” or “sweet leaf,” bee balm is one of the best plants to poultice on burns of any kind.
    above statement from here- http://crabappleherbs.com/blog/category/herbs/bee-balm/


    Bee Balm
    A Beautiful and Useful Plant for your Garden

    By Monica Resinger

    Description and Growing Information
    Bee Balm is a very pretty herb with a wonderful fruity, minty aroma. The gorgeous tubular flowers, held like a crown at the top of the 3-4 foot stems in mid and late summer come in a lot of colors including red, pink and purple.

    On top of all these qualities, it is a hardy perennial herb that will grow in all zones. Bee Balm requires full sun or light shade and fertile, light and moist soil. It is best propagated by division or cuttings rather than seed because the seed isn't always true to the parent plant.
    In the Garden

    Bee Balm is so pretty it should be included in your flower beds. It will attract bees, butterflies and hummingbirds to your garden. I know it's hard to welcome bees into the garden, but remember that we need them to pollinate our plants. Good partners for Bee Balm are Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea), Black Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia), and Lavender (Lavandula). .

    Uses

    Tea. This is a wonderful tea herb. To make a cup of tea, simply place tablespoon of fresh or one teaspoon of dried Bee Balm leaves and/or flowers in a tea strainer or tea spoon and pour one cup of boiling water over it. Allow it to steep for ten minutes and bring the tea out. Sweeten if you wish and enjoy.

    Cut Flowers. The flowers make excellent cut flowers. Be sure to cut the stems at an angle so they can take up water.

    Culinary. Chop the leaves and flowers and add to fruit salads for extra flavor. Garnish any type of salad with the leaves and flowers.
    Preserving

    The leaves and flowers of Bee Balm can be dried and used for potpourri or tea. To dry, bundle 8-10 stems with a rubber band at the cut end and hang upside down until crisp to the touch. Crush and store in airtight containers out of direct sunlight.
    Bee Balm can be added to fruit salads, pork recipes, punches and other beverage recipes plus it can be substituted for mint.
    Summer Punch
    Ingredients:
    1 cup granulated sugar
    1 cup fresh lemon juice
    1 cup Bee balm leaves
    1/2 cup raspberries
    2 cups cranberry juice
    1/2 cup mint leaves (any variety)
    1 47 ounce can chilled pineapple juice
    3 liters of ginger ale
    In a sauce pan dissolve the sugar in the lemon juice, over low heat. Add the bee balm and raspberries. Bring to a simmer, stir to break up the raspberries. When the sugar is dissolved, strain leaves and berries out of the liquid. Add cranberry juice and mint, stirring well. Chill up to 24 hours. When ready to serve, pour into a punch bowl and add pineapple juice, ice and ginger ale.
    Bee Balm Iced Tea
    Ingredients:
    1/2 cup Bee Balm flowers and leaves
    8 cups boiling water
    Pour the boiling water over the Bee Balm. Cover and steep until cool, about an hour. Strain and discard flowers. You can sweeten with sugar if desired. Chill until ready to use and serve over ice.
    Bee Balm Tea: Pour one cup of boiling water over 1/4 cup fresh leaves and allow to brew for 5 minutes. Strain and sweeten if you wish before serving. To use dried bee balm pour one cup of boiling water over two teaspoons of the dried leaves. Brew the same and strain.
    Summer Tea Blend
    Ingredients:
    3 tbsp. dried chamomile flowers
    1 tbsp. dried bee balm leaves
    2 tsp. dried rosemary
    1 tbsp. apple or pineapple mint leaves
    Mix all the dried herbs together in a jar. Use 2 tsp. of the mix per cup of tea. Steep for 5 minutes and strain. Sweeten with honey or sugar if you wish.
    About the author:Brenda Hyde is an avid herb gardener, wife and mom to three living in the midwest United States. She's also editor and owner of Old Fashioned Living.
    You can buy bulk dried Bee Balm at Glenbrook Farm
    from: http://www.seedsofknowledge.com/beebalm2.html

    The flavor of Earl Gray tea is often attributed to Monarda, yet, the taste actually originates from the oil of Citrus aurantium bergamia. The plants are unrelated but have similar flavors. To create a mock-Earl Gray tea, steep 2 tablespoons of dried Monarda flowers with a good black tea for 5-7 minutes. A single cup can be made by pouring one cup of boiling water over 2 teaspoons of dried flowers in a tea infuser or strainer. DO NOT BOIL THE FLOWERS. Boiling can evaporate the oils which produce the flavor. It is best to use the flowers for tea, the leaves have a hotter, oregano-like flavor.
    The flavor of Monarda combines well with tropical fruits like pineapple, mango and orange. Use flowers and leaves in recipes for chicken, turkey, and pork dishes. Monarda fruit punch is delicious, and the flowers a colourful addition to salads.


    National Herb Week Punch

  • 1 gallon cranberry-raspberry juice with ½ gallon set aside
  • 1 quart can apricot nectar
  • 2 quarts Bee Balm tea, with one quart set aside (see below)
  • 1 orange, sliced
  • 1 lemon, sliced
  • 2 quarts club soda
    Prepare the day ahead by putting all ingredients in the refrigerator to chill. Combine the half gallon of cranberry-raspberry juice and 1 quart of the Bee Balm tea and freeze that amount in ice cube trays or quart freezer container. Freeze for 24 hours before serving time. To serve: Put frozen juice in punch bowl and pour remaining liquid over, adding orange and lemon slices. Add 2 quarts of chilled club soda and float Bee Balm flowers if desired.


    Bee Balm Tea

  • ½ cup Bee Balm flowers or flowers and leaves
  • 2 quarts (8 cups) boiling water
    Pour rapidly boiling water over Bee Balm flowers. Cover and steep until cool, about an hour. Strain and discard flowers. Chill until ready to use.


    Comments regarding the above article can be addressed to:
    Marilyn Edmison-Driedger
    E-mail The Herbal Touch

    from: http://www.theherbaltouch.com/iha/monarda.html

    this is a site I found that sells their own homemade soap with bee balm and oatmeal, describes how they do it
    http://www.localharvest.org/store/item.jsp?id=615


    These spicy flowers are large and colorful. The red varieties like Cambridge Scarlet Bee Balm tend to be a bit hotter than their purple counterparts. But, the purple flowered varieties produce more flowers for a longer period of time. Often called Bergamot because of its citrusy flavor similar to the Bergamot Orange Tree, a tablespoon of Bee Balm flowers makes a great addition to the oil when frying white fish or scallops. Their strong flavor also goes well with meat and pork dishes. Whole flowers make attractive floaters in punch bowls of Sangria. Whole flowers also make good plate rings; surround the outside of your entrée platter with Bee Balm flowers to create a more visually appealing dish. Bee Balm flowers can be fresh frozen and will keep for two months or more.
    Bee Balm is a herbaceous plant, which means it dies back to the ground in the winter. Each year the base of the plant will spread as its stems spread just under the surface of the soil and set down roots. Mulching encourages this by giving the rhizomes soft dirt to stretch out in.
    Bee Balm leaves are very strongly flavored and should be dried before use. Add the dried leaves to black tea and make your own Earl Grey.
    from here- http://www.mountainvalleygrowers.com/edibleflowerherbgarden.htm
    BEE BALM
    Used for bee Stings. Bee Balm is a member of the mint family. It is native to North America but colonists soon sent seeds to Europe for their friends to plant and enjoy. Tea brewed from its leaves was called Oswego tea and was used as a substitute for china tea after the 1773 Boston Tea Party.
    from here-interesting site about the history of herbs- http://www.chaddsfordhistory.org/history/herbs4.htm
    For the Cook Who Likes to Garden, and the Gardener Who Likes to Cook:
    Bee Balm and Peaches

    by R. Ohlgren-Evans, from the August 1998 newsletter Bee Balm (Monarda didyma), also known as Bergamot, may owe its name to the resemblance of its fragrance to that of the bergamot orange. However, it is the orange, not the herb, whose oil flavors Earl Grey tea and some perfumes. Bee balm is often found in gardens on the Palouse, probably because of its reputation as a great lure to bees and hummingbirds. Scarlet is the most common and best-known color of this species, but cultivars range from white to pink and lavender. To use them in the kitchen, rinse the flower heads gently and pat dry. Pull the individual florets from the blossom head. Bergamot flowers are especially good with summer fruits and are used in jams, jellies, and desserts, and also make a colorful garnish for salads and drinks. Peach Shortcakes with Bergamot Flowers
    6 to 8 very ripe peaches, peeled and sliced
    1 Tbs. lemon juice
    1 to 2 Tbs. Bergamot florets
    2 cups flour
    1 Tbs. baking powder
    Scant ½ tsp. salt
    3 Tbs. sugar
    6 Tbs. butter
    1 cup half-and-half with 1 Tbs. Bergamot florets
    1 Tbs. butter, melted
    Whipping cream or vanilla ice cream or yogurt
    Preheat oven to 425 degrees F, and lightly grease a baking sheet. Toss the peaches in a bowl with the lemon juice, sugar and half of the Bergamot flowers. If the fruit is tart, use the larger amount of sugar; if it is sweet, use less. Reserve the remaining flowers for garnishing the dessert.
    Combine the flour, baking powder, salt, and 2 Tbs. of the sugar in a bowl or food processor. Cut the butter into the mixture until it is a coarse meal. Add the half-and-half with the Bergamot flowers to the
    dry ingredients and mix until just blended; do not overmix. Turn the dough onto a floured surface and knead 8 or 10 times. Roll or pat the dough to about 3/4 inches thick. Using a 3-inch cutter, cut out rounds using all of the dough. Place the rounds of dough on the baking sheet, brush the tops with the melted butter, and sprinkle them with the reserved tablespoon of sugar. Bake the cakes in the center of the oven for 12 to 14 minutes, or until golden brown. Cool the shortcakes for at least 5 minutes before splitting them open; they are best served warm, but are still good at room temperature. To assemble the shortcakes, split them in half. Place a spoonful of fruit on the bottom half with a bit of the juice. Add a dollop of whipped cream (or substitute) and cover with the top half of the shortcake. Repeat layers of fruit and cream and garnish the top with a few peach slices. Scatter the reserved Bergamot blossoms over the desserts and serve immediately.


    from- http://www.moscowfood.coop/archive/9808recipies.html

    I will end with this article from: http://www.emedicinal.com/herbs/americanbeebalm.php

    Legends, Myths and Stories

    This plant is entirely different and hardier than Melissa. It is a beautiful scarlet flowering native American mint. The foliage has a perfume fragrance. The flowers are so popular with bees that the plant deserves the name American bee balm. Bergamot or bee balm is a part of American history; it is a source of tea which was a popular substitute for the imported variety amongst the mid-Atlantic patriots in the wake of the Boston Tea Party. That period was probably the best in bergamot's history, though it retains its mystique, thanks to a striking appearance and the richly American nick-name, Oswego tea. The name Oswego tea came from the town, Oswego, New York? More likely both the town and the tea acquired the name Oswego from the Native Americans inhabiting the area, who had it first. The Native Americans passed their knowledge of the plant to the colonists, and one, a John Bartram of Philadelphia, reportedly sent seeds to England in the mid-1700s. From England, bergamot traveled to the Continent, where it is still cultivated, generally under the names gold melissa and Indian nettle. Among the foremost growers of this herb in the United States were the Shakers, who had a settlement near Oswego, New York. The Shakers were among America's great herbalists; they valued bergamot not only for tea and culinary uses, but for its medicinal virtues. The leaves can be used to flavor apple jelly, fruit cups, and salads. The entire plant emits a strong fragrance similar to citrus, but most like that of the tropical tree, orange bergamot, hence the nickname bergamot. The scent is suitable for use in potpourris and other scented mixtures. The bright red flowers attract bees, hummingbirds, and butterflies and make striking, long-lasting cut blooms. The blossoms provide the flavoring for the famous Earl Grey tea. The flowers are also edible. The hills around Pittsfield, Massachusetts are rife with this plant, wild and domestic.


    Uses

    An infusion is good for colds, coughs, nausea, and sore throats. Native Americans used leaf tea for colic, gas, colds, fever, stomachaches, nosebleeds, insomnia, heart trouble, measles, and to induce sweating. Poultice used for headaches. Historically, physicians used leaf tea to expel worms and gas.


    Formulas or Dosages

    The best quality tea material is achieved if the leaves are stripped off the square, hollow stems and dried in warm shade within 2-3 days. A longer drying period might discolor the leaves, producing an inferior type product. Finish drying with artificial heat when necessary.
  • LinkWithin

    Related Posts with Thumbnails