Friday, August 10, 2012

Import blog-wild mushrooms

Blog EntrySep 24, '09 6:06 PM
for everyone
Late yesterday afternoon Larry, with bags in hand, says I am going out mushroom hunting-"Wait for me" I say.
We have had so much more rain this year than normal, that there are mushrooms growing like crazy. The only fall ones that we know are edible are the corals.
Here is a little information on them:    CORAL FUNGI (Clavariaceae) Description: These fungi appear as clumps of branching stems which point upward. They do look much like coral. Most are tan, whitish or yellowish; a few are pinkish or purple. Also called club fungi, antler mushrooms or doghair mushrooms.
Size: clusters may be up to 8" high. When and Where: Summer and fall; in wooded areas, growing on the ground or on decaying logs.
 Cautions: A few coral fungi have a laxative effect, and some people seem to be particularly sensitive. Avoid coral fungi that taste bitter, bruise brown when handled or have gelatinous bases. These are most likely to cause trouble. No serious poisonings from coral fungi have been reported.
 Cooking Hints: Tips and upper branches are most tender. Saute and add to vegetables or white sauce
 above taken from http://mdc.mo.gov/nathis/mushrooms/mushroom/edible.htm

 We gathered up enough to share, and last night I  rinsed them in a salt water soak, and then I put most of  them in the dehydrator-they filled one deyhdrator. I also kept out some to cook with.
 I love the wild mushrooms for soup stocks especially, or just sauteed a bit in butter and olive oil.
These corals are a tender fragile mushroom, I cooked up some in butter with the few we gathered the other night, and last night I put a big handful into the anasazi bean pot-which by the way turned out super tasty.
I would like to can some of these mushrooms since they are so plentiful this year, but I am out of the 1/2 pint jars so would need to buy some, and would also need to clean up my pressure canner. right now easier to dehydrate-lol
 I am thinking I need to get going on gathering up some natural dye materials out of the woods soon for my dye project on cotton muslin. Still cloudy and rains here though off and on thru the coming weekend.
Below I took a photo of all the mushrooms we collected, and also a close up.

I should have taken the camera with me when we were out in the woods-so many cool things to take photos of-I may do that later on today. I am still cutting out fabric.
Oh, and I think I figured out what the problem was here on multiply for me last night and still this morning, Larry did something with all those pop up ads, and I was doing something here for a link that I had to disable the pop up blocker for-and when I did that everything worked here again. So, I guess there are more ads here then one realizes.

Blog EntrySep 24, '09 6:06 PM
for everyone
Late yesterday afternoon Larry, with bags in hand, says I am going out mushroom hunting-"Wait for me" I say.
We have had so much more rain this year than normal, that there are mushrooms growing like crazy. The only fall ones that we know are edible are the corals.
Here is a little information on them:    CORAL FUNGI (Clavariaceae) Description: These fungi appear as clumps of branching stems which point upward. They do look much like coral. Most are tan, whitish or yellowish; a few are pinkish or purple. Also called club fungi, antler mushrooms or doghair mushrooms.
Size: clusters may be up to 8" high. When and Where: Summer and fall; in wooded areas, growing on the ground or on decaying logs.
 Cautions: A few coral fungi have a laxative effect, and some people seem to be particularly sensitive. Avoid coral fungi that taste bitter, bruise brown when handled or have gelatinous bases. These are most likely to cause trouble. No serious poisonings from coral fungi have been reported.
 Cooking Hints: Tips and upper branches are most tender. Saute and add to vegetables or white sauce
 above taken from http://mdc.mo.gov/nathis/mushrooms/mushroom/edible.htm

 We gathered up enough to share, and last night I  rinsed them in a salt water soak, and then I put most of  them in the dehydrator-they filled one deyhdrator. I also kept out some to cook with.
 I love the wild mushrooms for soup stocks especially, or just sauteed a bit in butter and olive oil.
These corals are a tender fragile mushroom, I cooked up some in butter with the few we gathered the other night, and last night I put a big handful into the anasazi bean pot-which by the way turned out super tasty.
I would like to can some of these mushrooms since they are so plentiful this year, but I am out of the 1/2 pint jars so would need to buy some, and would also need to clean up my pressure canner. right now easier to dehydrate-lol
 I am thinking I need to get going on gathering up some natural dye materials out of the woods soon for my dye project on cotton muslin. Still cloudy and rains here though off and on thru the coming weekend.
Below I took a photo of all the mushrooms we collected, and also a close up.

I should have taken the camera with me when we were out in the woods-so many cool things to take photos of-I may do that later on today. I am still cutting out fabric.
Oh, and I think I figured out what the problem was here on multiply for me last night and still this morning, Larry did something with all those pop up ads, and I was doing something here for a link that I had to disable the pop up blocker for-and when I did that everything worked here again. So, I guess there are more ads here then one realizes.
Blog EntrySep 24, '09 6:06 PM
for everyone
Late yesterday afternoon Larry, with bags in hand, says I am going out mushroom hunting-"Wait for me" I say.
We have had so much more rain this year than normal, that there are mushrooms growing like crazy. The only fall ones that we know are edible are the corals.
Here is a little information on them:    CORAL FUNGI (Clavariaceae) Description: These fungi appear as clumps of branching stems which point upward. They do look much like coral. Most are tan, whitish or yellowish; a few are pinkish or purple. Also called club fungi, antler mushrooms or doghair mushrooms.
Size: clusters may be up to 8" high. When and Where: Summer and fall; in wooded areas, growing on the ground or on decaying logs.
 Cautions: A few coral fungi have a laxative effect, and some people seem to be particularly sensitive. Avoid coral fungi that taste bitter, bruise brown when handled or have gelatinous bases. These are most likely to cause trouble. No serious poisonings from coral fungi have been reported.
 Cooking Hints: Tips and upper branches are most tender. Saute and add to vegetables or white sauce
 above taken from http://mdc.mo.gov/nathis/mushrooms/mushroom/edible.htm

 We gathered up enough to share, and last night I  rinsed them in a salt water soak, and then I put most of  them in the dehydrator-they filled one deyhdrator. I also kept out some to cook with.
 I love the wild mushrooms for soup stocks especially, or just sauteed a bit in butter and olive oil.
These corals are a tender fragile mushroom, I cooked up some in butter with the few we gathered the other night, and last night I put a big handful into the anasazi bean pot-which by the way turned out super tasty.
I would like to can some of these mushrooms since they are so plentiful this year, but I am out of the 1/2 pint jars so would need to buy some, and would also need to clean up my pressure canner. right now easier to dehydrate-lol
 I am thinking I need to get going on gathering up some natural dye materials out of the woods soon for my dye project on cotton muslin. Still cloudy and rains here though off and on thru the coming weekend.
Below I took a photo of all the mushrooms we collected, and also a close up.

I should have taken the camera with me when we were out in the woods-so many cool things to take photos of-I may do that later on today. I am still cutting out fabric.

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