Wednesday, August 31, 2011

An Article on Rst Dye

I love doing this technique-and I just got this article in a newsletter-so thought I would share, in case any of you would like to try it-this is so much fun.
Cloth Paper Scissors Today
Whip Up Unique Fabric Designs

When the winds are howling and the rain is pelting, and the threat of losing your electricity looms large thanks to a hurricane, what kind of art do you make?

I asked our Cloth Paper Scissors Facebook friends what they would do, and got some very fun answers, such as:
  • circles and spirals
  • wind chimes
  • watercolors
  • mixed media
  • prayer flags
  • anything you can do in the dark
fabric design with rust
Rust dyeing on white and
printed cotton.
So what did I do? I took advantage of the ultra-humid conditions on my front porch to rust some fabric.

Humidity brings out the best in rust, which is why you see so much rusty metal lying around in places that are near water and get a lot of rain, like New England, the Pacific Northwest, and the areas around the Great Lakes.

I really delight in changing the character of fabric through overdyeing, but I'm not one to keep vats of dye going. I don't have an appropriate space for a wet studio and I don't have the time or patience to continually set up and break down a dyeing set-up. Someday . . .

But for now, I look for quick and easy ways to make fabric my own. I alter fabric with paint, ink, printing, stamping, tea dyeing, and rusting, and that keeps me pretty busy.

Rusting is easy, and, with minimal precautions, safe. The results are not completely predictable, but for me that's part of the charm. Depending on the rusty metal items you use and how long you leave them in contact with the fabric, you can get wonderful organic shapes and mottled coloring that can look modern or vintage.
Here are the basic steps:

Materials
  • Rusty metal objects such as nails, nuts and bolts, washers, bits and pieces, keys, etc.
  • Natural fabric, such as cotton (white or prints on a white or light ground work best)
  • White vinegar and a container
  • Water
  • Humid conditions (Hurricane weather not necessary!)
Directions
1. Wet the fabric with water and squeeze it out so it's not dripping.

2. Immerse the fabric in a container of white vinegar (just enough to cover the fabric), then squeeze remove and wring out the excess.
fabric design with rust
Large washers made
distinct shapes.
3. Wrap a rusty object in your fabric, drape the wet fabric over the object, or lay the rusty object on top of the fabric and place on top of a protected surface (the vinegar and rust can stain a counter, wood, etc.). You want to ensure close contact between the fabric and the rusted object.

4. Check back periodically to see how it's coming along. Typically, the longer the fabric stays damp, the richer the color and the more indistinct the images will be. When the fabric dries quickly, the image transfer yields crisp forms and outlines.

Note: If you lay the fabric on a piece of paper, such as paper toweling or watercolor paper, to dry, you'll end up with some nice rusty paper, too.

5. When the fabric has air dried, wash it and heat set by putting it into a hot dryer or iron it without steam.

I'm really excited about my rusted fabric and can't wait to create something with it. I might print over it, cut it up and stitch it, apply paint or ink . . . the possibilities are spinning in my mind.

The third Towel


What's been fun about this weaving project, is changing the colors of the weft for each towel. I am liking this combination too.
This draft (pattern) does really weave up quickly, and most weavers would be finished already, but you know me-gotta bounce around from one creativity to the next lol acutally I am not able to sit and weave for more than 30 minutes at a time, and just haven't stuck with it cause my bear wall hanging was getting all my attention. But I got a bug last night to weave off the second towel and then started up on the second towel last night as well.

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Apples and a Bear Fiberart Picture



I just finished this piece except for sewing on a hanging sleeve on the back, but wanted to share photos. I am really happy with this piece, my first in a series of bear fiberart pictures.
I always welcome feedback, and opinions-thanks

Monday, August 29, 2011

How to put in the css code for a theme

A couple of you have asked me to help with your pages-

I really have no clue on how to do much with backgrounds, what little I do know I have learned by asking friends here.

if you want to change the background with your own photos-click on customize my site, then when the top opens up click on choose a theme and then click on custom colors. that will open up for you to put in your photos, and change the color theme, I also learned that you can put in your colors too-there are different sites that give you codes for the colors and then you just play around by copy and paste into the slots for your background, headers etc.

if you find someone that designs pages that you like, they will give you instructions first on what theme to choose-most seem to choose avlak theme so you need to first click on customize my site-then click on the theme they tell you to use that will take you back to your home page. then you need to open up customize my site again-and click on custom css-that will open up a page that you paste the css code that the designer gave you to copy. hope that helps a little.

Those of you that are more knowledgeble-please fill free to offer any helpful advise for designer our pages

Healthy Mondays a Healthy Packed Lunch


Found some nice ideas: here, cost cutting tips here, more here
some nice ideas here with no sandwiches great for older school kids or for a packed lunch going to work

(photos found on google)
If you do a google search for brown bag lunch recipes-there are lots of choices from Martha Stewart to the Food Network-so make yourself a fun, delicious, healthier packed lunch

Friday, August 26, 2011

Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

The first day we hit a high in the 70s, I will be making cake-lol I have a taste for some baked goodies.
I have been searching for gluten free recipes that are not based on a mix-those mixes usually carry too much sugar and I can adjust that from a "made from scratch" recipe
One Bowl Gluten Free Chocolate Cake. Photo by h.abear
Here is the flour blend that this author is using http://www.food.com/recipe/gluten-free-flour-blend-208061
and here is her cake recipe http://www.food.com/recipe/one-bowl-gluten-free-chocolate-cake-209764
I like this recipe cause it only uses one egg, not alot of oil, and I can adjust the sugar to 1/2 cup or use splenda or I just got in xylitol.

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

A Little Hump Day Handmade Making a Hammock

It's never too late to make a hammock--here's how to make one simple-greener living
Found this fun video with instructions here
Here is one that takes a little more work here
And found this etsy video on how to make a hammock here
Here's one a little more involved here and another one like this with photos here
Hammocks
hammocks!
photos found on photobucket


Monday, August 22, 2011

Have an Awesome New Week!

photo found on flicker

We are in for another hot week-100s by wednesday again-sigh This morning I am catching up on laundry and hanging it on the line-great exercise for me-since the line is a good walk from the house-and good for stretching too.

I started to quilt the latest bear picture, I backed it with a piece of my hand dyed onion skins cotton-blends in so nice with the rust dye piece in the front.

I am cleaning up all of our leathers too-needed to get into this big trunk, decided I wanted to turn it for more room-so that meant emptying it-good thing-cause the mink oil we put on the leathers came to surface-so need to rub out all the white stuff-and discovering my chaps don't fit anymore-sigh-but then I was a 105 pounds when these were bought-and now I am closer to 130-so I need to get serious about losing some inches again-although I definately don't want to get that thin again.

making wild turkey soup today with rice noodles, and probably work on some other domestic stuff that needs to get done.

Enjoy your new week!!--discover something new, read a new book, give someone a big hug, and smile when I get down about stuff, I remind myself-I am alive and living in a beautiful place-

Sunday, August 21, 2011

Healthy Mondays Recipes with Yogurt

There are lots of ways to use yogurt in recipes. I found a whole list at the Prevention site here
mmmmm Spinach Dip here

Potato Salad here
Potato Salad
Popeye Smoothie here

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Raisin Yogurt Cookies here
Yummy oatmeal chocolate chip raisin yogurt cookies

Saturday, August 20, 2011

Art Sunday Fiber Artists

As you know I love anything fiber, and I have been experimenting with hand dyes both natural dyes and chemical, rust dyes, quilting, weaving, rug hooking, and now needle felting, I am working towards finding a little niche in the fiber art world as well.
There are so many fiber artists worldwide to inspire us.
In the felting world-wow so much is really going on, from sculpture, felted wools, and needle felting.
I found this link with lots of felt artists to explore here

from here
Gorgeous works here

from here
More really cute animals needle felted here

from here
Be sure to visit the art sunday tour with our host nemo

Friday, August 19, 2011

It's a Friday and a Couple Flower Memes

Big Big storms passed thru this morning early around 2 am, high winds, close lightening to the house, lots of hard rain: but this morning shows no damages and it's a gorgeous ozarks day

Your Iris Says You're Very Spiritual
You are incredibly hopeful and courageous.
Even when you've been challenged in life, you have faith that everything will work out.

Your feelings run deep, and you are a very grateful person.
You are very effected by the world around you. You are thankful for the life you lead.
You Are a Carnation
You are down to earth and grounded.
You tend to be more traditional than trendy.
Your confidence gets you through anything.
People trust you and are very loyal to you.

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Apples and a Bear--Updated


I am so excited, my fiber art picture has taken on much improvement today, I am really loving it so much better now.
I asked for help from one of my artist-(painter) friends, Loretta, and I loved her suggestions for my water-I think it looks much more real now. Not sure yet, I may still try to add a little needle felting to look like rock behind the waterfall.
I also colored in the little log cabin, added lots more white to the water, a litttle more greenery, which I may need to add just a little something in the area behind the bear, but my Apples and a Bear has come to life
I am already thinking about pumpkins and a bear

Sunday, August 14, 2011

Art Sunday Camping-Camp Fire Coffee Being Served


from here

from here

from here

from here

from here
Oh, the coffee pot
camp fire coffee
Traditional Campfire CoffeeThere are numerous instructions and recipes for making coffee in a plain pot over a campfire. You may have to try a few varieties to see what suits you best.
1. Bring two quarts of water to a good, rolling boil. Take it from the fire and add 2 handfuls of ground coffee (fine grind). Since 'handful' is hardly a precise measurement, whoever makes the coffee will alter the results. Steep for 4 minutes. Add a few tablespoons of cold water to settle the grounds and then serve.
2. Add 6 teaspoons of ground coffee into the pot, and pour 3 pints of cold water over the grounds. Put the pot on the fire and bring to a boil. Take it off the heat and let steep for 3 minutes. Again, add a bit of cold water to settle the grounds. This makes 6 mugs of coffee.
3. This is the 'Canadian' version. In this recipe, you are supposed to use coarse ground coffee rather than fine. Use as much water as you want coffee, and use 2 heaping tablespoons of coffee for each cup. Add an extra cup of water, and an extra couple spoons of coffee 'for the pot'. (I'm not sure what that's supposed to mean). Sit this pot on hot coals, not open flame. Bring it slowly to a boil. When it boils, remove from the heat and let steep for 5 minutes. Add cold water to settle the grounds and serve.

Saturday, August 13, 2011

A Couple of Blog Things-it's all Deb's fault-lol

These are fun and can be addictive
You Are Wise
You are a prudent and rational person. You try not to do anything you regret, and if you do, you learn form your mistake.
You are educated or at the very least knowledgable. You have a perception that most people lack.

You've learned to be vigilant in your life. You are pretty much always on guard.
No matter how old you actually are, you are quite seasoned. You are experienced and worldly.
You Are Freedom Loving
You are laid back and easygoing with people. Too much intensity tires you out.
You believe that there is a lot to still be discovered in this world, and you're hoping to find some of it.

You are blessed with an enormous amount of self-confidence. You love who you are.
Structure and rules bore you. Even worse - they make you feel stifled.
Your Spirit Flower is the Iris
You are social and gregarious. You make other people feel at ease.
You are a natural healer. You can make almost anyone cheer up simply by being around.

You take time to reflect on the beauty of life. You have your own private rituals that you draw strength from.
You are a wholesome person. You live a low-key, low drama, and healthy life.

Friday, August 12, 2011

In remembrance of Food Fridays---Food of the Civil War

I used to post food fridays over on 360 with Agnes of France, and also with Deb in NC, so since we are in the years of remembering the civil war-150 years ago, I decided to research food today


Food in the Civil War


Although weapons, clothing and shelter were of the greatest importance to the soldiers, food was a necessary element of survival. Here you will find recipes and cooking techniques that the Civil War soldier used to help him get by during his struggle to survive.
More links with recipes and informative information:
Civil war recipes and food here
Civil war recipes here
Food During the War
As the war continued, Southerners began to feel the pinch of food shortages, especially in the cities, where residents did not produce their own food and had large concentrated populations. As the Union established more and more blockades, farmers were less able to transport food into the cities. While rural areas felt the shortages as well, most rural residents were farmers and were used to hunting or growing their own food.
Some popular dishes in the South included fried ham with red-eye gravy and biscuits, Hopping John (a stew made with bacon, peas or beans, and red pepper). Vegetables included tomatoes (Ruffled Yellow), lettuce (head, leaf, and romaine), beans (Great Northern Yellow Eye, Jacob's Cattle) and snap beans, sweet corn (Black Aztec), cabbage, potato (Early Rose and Irish potatoes), cucumbers, pumpkins, melons and beets.
Men on the field often ate canned food, as storage was more difficult since soldiers would travel from camp to camp every day. Some of the labels are surprisingly familiar:
� Underwood Deviled Ham>
� Lea and Perrins Worcestershire Sauce>
� Borden's Condensed Milk>
� Van Camp's Pork and Beans>
� McIlhenny Company's Tabasco Sauce>

from here

Thursday, August 11, 2011

Gluten Free No Bake Apple Bars


Ingredients:
  • 4 cups Cinnamon Chex� or Rice Chex� cereal
  • 2/3 cup chopped dried apples
  • 1/2 cup sliced almonds
  • 1/2 cup sweetened dried cranberries
  • 1 tablespoon butter or margarine
  • 1/2 cup light corn syrup
  • 1/4 cup packed brown sugar
Preparation Instructions:
  1. Line bottom and sides of 8-inch square pan with foil. Spray foil with cooking spray. In large bowl, mix cereal, apples, almonds and cranberries; set aside.
  2. In 1-quart saucepan, heat butter, corn syrup and brown sugar over medium-high heat, stirring constantly, until sugar is dissolved and mixture comes to a boil. Boil 2 minutes, stirring constantly, until slightly thickened.
  3. Pour over cereal mixture in bowl; stir until evenly coated. Using buttered back of spoon, press mixture firmly in pan. Refrigerate 1 hour or until firm enough to cut.
  4. For bars, cut into 4 rows by 4 rows. Store covered at room temperature up to 1 week.

from here

Herbs of the Civil War

This week and then with the main events this weekend for the reenactment of the second major battle of the civil war at Wilson Creek Springfield Mo will be held. They are expecting over 80,000 people to attend this event.
That got me to thinking about herbs and such during this time period.
I found this article for the civil war kitchen garden here
Civil War Medicine at Home here this is an excellent find with several pages of information of herbs and their use-even includes a page of wive tales
An article on Civil War nurses here
Interview of a confederate surgeon and the herbs he used here
and comfrey was used to dress and heal wounds and broken bones
Searching for information for this post, I ran into many books on this subject as well
and if you live in the New England Area there is a Garden in the Woods at Framingham, Ma with herbs planted that were used during the civil war here This was one of several that I ran into, all commemorating the 150th anniversary of our Civil War

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

A Little Hump Day Handmade Needle Felting

I have been loving needle felting, especially with the silk so thought I would do a little post on it. I have noticed over on etsy, alot of people are making little needle felted animals and such-I am not really interested in learning how to do that, but I do love it for accents or embelishments on a cotton or wool fiber piece.
Found this fun video for someone just learning

Here is one on how to make a needle felted pumpkin
This is an informative video on wool
and here is a how to instructional on needle felting basics http://knitting.about.com/od/felting/ss/needle-felting.htm
In my opinion, there is no need to get alot of money involved in supplies. I have learned a perfect base to work on is a thick foam piece-find a reclaimed one, or purchase one in the craft section. This is so much cheaper than the "special" foam they sell just for needle felting, and can be as large as you want it to be too.
I started out with a single needle and I really like it the best so far. I found a good price for them at the Woolery
and for the wool sometimes you can buy little bags of it at garage sales or resale shops, craft fairs can be a good place, also there are lots of choices over on etsy-just put in needle felting in the supplies category.
I ran into this site http://www.needlefeltingfans.com/ with lots of information and links too.
So go have some fun with needle felting

Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Photo of my canned hot pepper relish and salsa from today's work


These were made from the recipes I recently posted, the hot pepper relish I made with cabbage instead of onions, and it turned out much hotter, but still great flavor

BBQ Chicken on the Beach

I found this menu from the Barefoot Contessa Here This would be awesome for those of living near a beach or perhaps camping near a beach.
Here is the bbq chicken recipe from the Barefoot Conessa

Barbecued Chicken

Copyright 1999, The Barefoot Contessa Cookbook, All Rights Reserved
Serves:
6 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 chickens (2 1/2 to 3 pounds each), quartered, with backs removed
  • 1 recipe Barbecue Sauce, recipe follows

Directions

Marinate the chickens in 2/3 of the barbecue sauce for a few hours or overnight in the refrigerator.

Heat the coals in a charcoal grill. Spread the bottom of the grill with a single layer of hot coals and then add a few more coals 5 minutes before cooking, which will keep the fire going longer. Place the chicken quarters on the grill, skin side down, and cook for about 45 minutes, turning once or twice to cook evenly on both sides. Brush with the marinade as needed. The chicken quarters are done when you insert a knife between a leg and thigh and the juices run clear. Discard any unused marinade.

Serve with extra barbecue sauce on the side.

Barbecue Sauce:

In a large saucepan on low heat, saute the onions and garlic with the vegetable oil for 10 to 15 minutes, until the onions are translucent but not browned. Add the tomato paste, vinegar, honey, Worcestershire sauce, mustard, soy sauce, hoisin sauce, chili powder, cumin, and red pepper flakes. Simmer uncovered on low heat for 30 minutes. Use immediately or store in the refrigerator.

Yield: 1 1/2 quarts

What I've Been Up To

Mostly still canning, or I should say mostly dicing and dicing and more dicing to can-lol
I can't do two batches per day any more, as it has been taking me about 6 hours to get all the peppers, onions, and tomatoes prepared to make into salsas and relish and then can. We are just loving the results though.
This is the best salsa I have made to can, the cilantro, lime juice, and the hot banana peppers just really made the recipe and after canned-still tastes like a fresh salsa-so this recipe is a keeper. (recipe in my recipe file)
I have made two batches of the salsa now and one batch of the hot pepper relish so far and I still have lots of peppers left. I am splitting all the batches with Mr. L as he bought half the peppers and tomatoes for me. Today I will be making more of the hot pepper relish but instead of the onions will use shredded cabbage to mix with the peppers. Makes a little different relish that way, and the cabbage is really good in a canned relish.
I have decided my bear picture is finished now, just need to locate a frame and will search first at the resale shops. I really wanted to seal it all down with the mistyfuse and tulle, but have decided with all the different layers-thin cotton next to a thicker wool-that it probably will not fuse down well, so will put this one under glass instead. I was thinking of doing a sample, which I may still do, but hate to waste the materials on a sample-but then I could design a card that could be used after the sample test I am thinking as I am typing-lol
I have ordered another bag of silk noil in fall colors, so am going to work on some pictures to sell in my etsy shop, with autumn leaves, deer and such.
I wish I could share this awesome weather week with those of you still so much in need of rain and a break from the high temps. We are actually in the 60s now early morning instead of 80s, and yesterday it rained almost all day again and stayed in the 70s. This whole week shows cool temps and rain chances every day--this week feels like fall is coming for sure now.
Mr. L gave me two very awesome rocks that he found years ago here, so am anxious to get those set in my rock wall. Haven't been back to rocking with all the canning.
That's about it here in the ozarks, I am off to take my walk with Nikita. and wow a gorgeous morning for enjoying a cup of Hot tea

Have an awesome Tuesday

Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Thinking Ice Cream Memes to Stay Cool

You Are Chocolate Fudge Brownie Ice Cream
You just don't know when you've had enough (or too much)!
You Are Soft Serve
You are laid back, peaceful, and accepting.
You are easy to please, and you enjoy letting others do things their way.

People might be surprised to know that you're experimental and funky - at least in your own mind.
You are open to wherever life takes you, even if it's very unconventional.
You Are Peanut Butter Gelato
You are a giving and considerate person. You are concerned with making sure others are comfortable.
You are the type who spoils those closest to you. You are a natural giver.

While you feel more at ease when you're being the generous one, you have no problem accepting generosity from others.
You think everyone deserves to feel like a king or queen for the day, including you.

Tuesday, August 2, 2011

A Tea Meme

You Appreciate All of Life's Moments
You speak your mind and tell it how it is. You don't hold back when the truth needs to be told.

You have a very balanced personality. You know how to moderate yourself when you are feeling extreme.

You love everything about life, including the sadder and darker parts. You appreciate every emotion.

You are energetic and downright hyper. All sorts of ideas and opportunities excite you.

Iced Tea

I love Iced Tea, and it is a perfect way to get rehydrated during these hot spells
I have gotton lazy, but I love the results, and this was Larry's recipe. Take a glass decanter, fill with cold water, add tea bags, number goes according to your taste and size of container, then place in the frigerator-and in a few hours you have effortless ice tea. No more boiling water and then steeping, and then pouring over ice etc. this simple method makes wonderful clear iced tea. I don't like sweet tea, so I don't add any sweetners, but I do like to add a dash of lemon to my glass of tea.
recipes for healthy iced tea here
recipes for iced teas, frozen, lattes, fruits etc here
recipes for southern sweet teas here and here


Chicken for a Tuesday

Felt like doing a chicken tuesdays post today. And since we are headed towards another record breaker with the heat-106 degrees today actual temperature-a crock pot will be a good energy saver in the kitchen.
Garlic Brown Sugar Crock Pot Chicken here this recipe uses lots of sugar but it looked really good otherwise, and one could always cut that sugar to 1/2 cup instead
Whole Chicken Crock Pot Recipe here
Kathy's Crock Pot Chicken What I like to do is take an organic whole chicken, rinse well with cold water, then stuff fresh sprigs of rosemary and thyme in the cavity, place in crock pot that had a couple tablespoons of water added.
Then sprinkle some olive oil all over the chicken and squeeze a fresh lemon all over the chicken too, and add some cracked pepper maybe a little additional spice of choice.
Roast in your crock pot on medium til fully done-and enjoy. No added heat in your kitchen during these hot spells
and don't forget to drink plenty of liquids-a good day for some fresh brewed ice tea
ice tea

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